Typically found in induced draft furnaces, an intermittent pilot ignites the burner gas with a high-voltage spark only when the thermostat calls for heat. Once the pilot is lit, and the main burner senses the pilot flame (using a flame sensing rod), the main burner ignites. The intermittent pilot flame goes out after the heating cycle and remains off until the next time the thermostat calls for heat. 
Refrigeration air conditioning equipment usually reduces the absolute humidity of the air processed by the system. The relatively cold (below the dewpoint) evaporator coil condenses water vapor from the processed air, much like an ice-cold drink will condense water on the outside of a glass. Therefore, water vapor is removed from the cooled air and the relative humidity in the room is lowered. The water is usually sent to a drain or may simply drip onto the ground outdoors. The heat is rejected by the condenser which is located outside of room to be cooled.
An air conditioner cools and dehumidifies the air as is passes over a cold coil surface. The indoor coil is an air-to-liquid heat exchanger with rows of tubes that pass the liquid through the coil. Finned surfaces connected to these tubes increase the overall surface area of the cold surface thereby increasing the heat transfer characteristics between the air passing over the coil and liquid passing through the coil. The type of liquid used depends on the system selected. Direct-expansion (DX) equipment uses refrigerant as the liquid medium. Chilled-water (CW) can also be used as a liquid medium. When the required temperature of a chilled water system is near the freezing point of water, freeze protection is added in the form of glycols or salts. Regardless of the liquid medium used, the liquid is delivered to the cooling coil at a cold temperature.
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace are the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.
The heat-exchanger cools the air that is being forced through it by the furnace blower. As the warm air comes in contact with this cool surface the water in the air condenses. By pulling the water molecules from the air. According to the psychometric chart[42] as relative humidity decreases in order to feel cool you will have to lower the temperature even more. A common way to counteract this effect is by installing a whole-home humidifier.[43] Similarly, installing a high efficient system this need to turn the temperature down wont have such and influence on your energy costs.
American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
When the thermostat calls for heat, 24 volts are sent to the electronic ignition control module, which energizes the furnace blower and other systems and sends 120 volts to the HSI. The HSI heats up to around 1,800°F to 2,500°F and glows red-hot. Then the gas valve opens, and the burner gas is ignited by the HSI. Once a proper flame is sensed by the flame sensor, the HSI turns off and stays off until the next heating cycle. In some furnaces, the HSI also serves as a flame sensor (called local sensing) instead of having a separate sensing rod in the burner flame (remote sensing).
When we’re in a customer’s home, we’re always on the lookout for things we can do to help them out and put a smile on their face. It could be as simple as changing a lightbulb or as involved as cleaning gutters, listing a car for sale online, or repairing a broken gate. There’s no limit to what we might do, and of course, there’s never any charge to help out. It’s good deeds for FREE!
For complex commercial heating and cooling systems, you need an expert. When you run into malfunctions, it’s not a DIY job to fix it. At Air Blue Heating and Cooling Inc., we know how important your HVAC systems are to running your commercial facility. Anytime you need repairs, maintenance, or installations, contact our team of licensed professionals. With our extensive industry background, we provide the highest quality service for your systems. We always adhere to strict standards for procedures, training, and customer service. As a Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer, we meet rigid standards for customer service and technical expertise, so you know you’re getting the very best. Give us a call any time of the day for efficient, accurate, and long-lasting commercial HVAC services in Elk Grove Village, Addison, Bedford Park, Bensenville, Elmhurst, Chicagoland and the surrounding suburbs.

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